Non-duality and the importance of contemplative practice

Franciscan Father and contemporary mystic, Richard Rohr, was recently quoted as saying that contemplation will save our Church. I would argue that not only will it save our Church, but it will save the world.

The ultimate purpose of contemplative practice is to unite ourselves with God, with the Divine Light that permeates all things. When we meditate we move away from our ego-mind, the place where we deduce, categorize, and make distinctions between ourselves and everyone else. Meditation grants us the opportunity to experience oneness of being and oh, Lord, how we desperately need that.

In my own experience I have witnessed a Church divided, a Church so committed to maintaining the status quo that it often dismisses the actual teachings of Jesus. The teachings of radical and transformational love. The teachings of turning the other cheek, and the last shall be first. Instead, we’re time and time again stuck in the mindset of this not that and us not them. This is not Christianity. This is living with dualistic thinking as your guide, not Jesus.

The problem with dualistic thinking is that it will never get us to God, it will always drag us further away because God is whole – always everywhere and in everything, we just don’t know how to recognize Divinity. Until we realize this, that we’re the problem (i.e. not the other person), we’ll be reaching for an unattainable goal. This is why Jesus says “the harvest is plentiful but the workers are few” (Mt:37).

So why are we averse to doing the work? Because it requires us to change and who wants that? Unfortunately my dear friends, it is the only way.

But don’t forget, the harvest is plentiful! Do not fear the work, it is for your benefit.

For those who are willing to join me in transforming ourselves into vessels for Love, this is the practice:

  1. Be kind and merciful, always.
  2. Spend time alone in meditation (don’t overthink this, just sit down and be for some time everyday).
  3. Spend time in nature.
  4. Sing songs and read poetry.
  5. Move your body in a way that results in joy (e.g. dance, yoga, walking, etc…)

These practices are bound to bring you a deep sense of contentment and who knows maybe you’ll meet God 😉

So much love,

Aurelija